How to Grill Seafood

Culinary Uses of Salmon

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Culinary Uses of SalmonSalmon is an incredibly versatile fish that can be cooked in so many different ways. The cooking technique one can apply to salmon varies from what part of the fish you are using. The most common and versatile cut available would either be a salmon fillet (cut lengthwise from the side of the backbone yielding two large pieces) or steaks (cut through the back bone yielding a somewhat circular piece with the cross section of the bone in the middle. Depending on the recipe and the size of the fish, it can be cut further into smaller portions. In most recipes, fillets and steaks can be interchanged with one another.

There are ways to cook a whole salmon for an impressive alternative to a meat centerpiece or carving carving. Pescetarians will love feasting on an entire stuffed oven-baked salmon with vegetable sidings served on a buffet spread or at a potluck party.

For those who aren’t queasy about eating other fish parts, the belly of a salmon is a lovely part of the fish which has most of the fat content. This can be cooked in a soup, grilled or simply pan fried with butter. The high fat content gives that distinct rich savory flavor without much guilt because it’s a good fat. The most exotic part would be the head which can also be made into a variety soups flavored with local spices. Usually the most affordable part of a fish, but some would debate that it has the most flavor– though getting to the meat take more effort that just picking it up with a fork. Make sure that you remove the gills and any remnants of blood before cooking. Some suggest rinsing or soaking the fish in salted water as well.

Due to its firm texture and high fat content, salmon stands up to practically all types of cooking: either dry heat like frying, grilling, smoking and pan roasting or moist techniques such as poaching, boiling and steaming. Depending on other ingredients used, salmon can take on the flavor profiles of different countries’ cuisine. Tamarind, miso, hoisin and soya sauce, peanut and sesame oils make for an Oriental flavor while olive oil, dill, capers, rosemary, white wine and mustard would be more western, continental or Mediterranean.

In most fish cookery, a citrus juice or another type of acid like vinegar is introduced to take away any fishy odor. Sidings are also dictated by the countries cuisine with noodles and rice accompanying Asian salmon dishes and couscous, polenta, potatoes and pasta being paired with western fish courses.

Canned salmon is widely used in everyday home cooking and is as easy as popping open a can and eating it straight or heating it up with other flavoring ingredients to make a sandwich or omelet filling, salad or pasta component. Raw and smoked salmon, used in a variety of cuisines, is a popular feature in cold buffets and sushi bars.

Canned and Smoked Salmon

Canned and Smoked Salmon

The majority of canned in the US are of [...]

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Cold Dishes

Cold Dishes

Salmon works very well in cold preparations because it [...]

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Hot Dishes

Hot Dishes

Whether you lucky to come across a fine piece [...]

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